From Soaking and Poking to Breaching Empathy Walls: Qualitative Research after Fenno

by Michael A. Smith, Professor of Political Science, Emporia State University It is hard to say goodbye to Richard Fenno (1926-2020).  He was truly one of a kind. Fenno called his style of…

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No, we are not More Divided Than Ever

by Michael A. Smith, Professor of Political Science, Emporia State University The other day, I was grading a student project when I noticed that they had written something that seems widely believed…

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A Boundary of White Inclusion: How Religion Shapes Perceptions of Ethnoracial Assignment

By Amanda Sahar d’Urso, Northwestern University The following blog post is a summary of the research that won the Midwest Political Science Association’s Lucius Barker Award (for research presented…

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Who is it Okay to Punch? An Experimental Investigation of Support for Intolerance in the Form of Physical Violence

By Frank J. Gonzalez and Alexandra McCoy The following blog post is a summary of the research that co-won the Midwest Political Science Association’s Best Paper in American Politics Award (presented…

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Looking Back at a Year of Robust Humanities Advocacy

By Alexandra Klein, NHA Communications and Government Relations Manager In early March, five months after Fiscal Year 2022 began, Congress finally passed a funding package for the year. The package…

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Blocking the Blockers: Charrettes, Urban Planning, and Deliberative Democracy

By: Adam Rego Johnson, The Graduate Center, CUNY The following blog post is a summary of the research that won the Midwest Political Science Association’s Best Paper by an Undergraduate Student Award…

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Practical Tips for Online Student Engagement

By James Steur, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Since the spread of COVID-19, many universities recognize that online teaching is here to stay. However, the online…

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Thoughts on the Future of Political Science

by Michael A. Smith, Professor of Political Science, Emporia State University Well, #MPSA2022 is in the books. From my perspective, the first in-person MPSA conference since 2019 was a success. As I…

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Define Your Success: A Roundtable on Surviving Graduate School

By James Steur, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Graduate school is an exciting time for students to explore their research interests and develop as a scholar. However, the…

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The Future of the Political Science Conference

by Michael A. Smith, Professor of Political Science, Emporia State University The MPSA’s in-person conference is back!  After being canceled entirely in 2020 and held virtually in 2021, this year’s…

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Conference Smarter Not Harder: An Interview with Dr. Gustavo Diaz

By James Steur, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign In this blog post, I’m interviewing Gustavo Diaz (pictured at left): a recent PhD graduate and Postdoctoral Fellow at the…

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First Things First When Teaching Civic Education

by Michael A. Smith, Professor of Political Science, Emporia State University Between 10 and 15 years ago, Political Science experienced a renewed interest in civic education.  The National…

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Think Congressional redistricting is hard? Wait until we get to state and local offices.

by Michael A. Smith, Professor of Political Science, Emporia State University Congressional redistricting is in the news–and in my inbox.  Every day, I get a dose of emails from both sides reminding…

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Remembering Burdett Loomis 

by Michael A. Smith, Professor of Political Science, Emporia State University Dr. Burdett “Bird” Loomis died in late September.  He served for many decades as a Professor of Political Science at the…

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Learn how Political Science Students are Improving Wikipedia

By: Dr. Helaine Blumenthal, Wiki Education For the past several years, MPSA has been partnering with Wiki Education to improve Wikipedia’s coverage of topics related to Political Science. In an era…

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Do-It-Yourself Redistricting and What I Learned

by Michael A. Smith, Professor of Political Science, Emporia State University I redistricted.  Here is what I learned. First, the basics.  Redistricting no longer requires sophisticated computer…

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Promising Signs for Humanities Funding in the New Administration

By Alexandra Klein, NHA Communications and Government Relations Manager The Biden administration’s request for a funding increase for the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and other…

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A Redistricting Primer

by Michael A. Smith, Professor of Political Science, Emporia State University It’s time for redistricting.  What does that mean, and what insights does political science offer? Every ten years, the…

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Making their work count: Political Science students improve Wikipedia

By: Dr. Helaine Blumenthal, Wiki Education Through its ongoing partnership with Wiki Education, MPSA has been helping political science and policy students engage with subject content in meaningful…

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Land Reform and Civil Conflict: Theory and Evidence from Peru

By Michael Albertus, University of Chicago 2021 AJPS Best Article Award Honorable Mention for the research entitled “Land Reform and Civil Conflict: Theory and Evidence from Peru” The distribution of…

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Do International Employment Opportunities Impact Individuals’ Political Preferences and Behavior?

By Nikhar Gaikwad, Kolby Hanson, and Aliz Toth Robert H. Durr Award for Best Paper “applying quantitative methods to a substantive problem,” presented at the 2019 Midwest Political Science…

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Georgia’s New Voting Laws Meet Political Science

by Michael A. Smith, Professor of Political Science, Emporia State University Controversy swirls around Georgia’s new voting laws, along with similar ones in Florida, Texas, and several other states.…

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Their economic pain, our emotional gain: Can schadenfreude motivate responses to redistributive policies?

By Hannah Nam, Samuel Jens, and Yanna Krupnikov New Jersey is one of the first states expected to adopt a “millionaires tax” that raises taxes on those who make over a million dollars a year. In…

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NHA’s Newest Resource Provides Strategies for Making the Case for the Humanities on Campus

By Scott Muir, Study the Humanities project director In the context of the financial fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic and the widespread decline in humanities majors and enrollments precipitated by…

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Biased? Sure. Lying, no.

by Michael A. Smith, Professor of Political Science, Emporia State University Accusations that the news media are biased are now so common as to become cliché.  Undoubtedly, the media are biased.  In…

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Trends in the Publicly Engaged Humanities in the Pandemic Moment

By Michelle May-Curry, Humanities for All project director At the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, many humanists set out to document the quickly worsening global health crisis. As the months…

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The ICPSR Summer Program: Furthering Great Research and Inspiring Great People

By: Scott Campbell, ICPSR Summer Program Communications Coordinator The ICPSR Summer Program in Quantitative Methods of Social Research started in 1963, and we’ve been called many things since then.…

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QAnon: The Conspiracy Theory Behind the Capitol Seizure

by Michael A. Smith, Professor of Political Science, Emporia State University  On January 6, followers of former President Trump stormed and seized the United States Capitol, temporarily halting the…

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Keeping an Eye on the Map, Notes from Central Eastern Europe

by Raluca Viman-Miller, Assistant Professor, University of North Georgia Nowadays we are completely overtaken by the COVID-19 global pandemic and our focus seems to almost exclusively be on counting…

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The Institute for Humane Studies – Working for You

Submitted by The Institute for Humane Studies When you think of the role of academia in society, what comes to mind? Perhaps you envision broader, intellectual discourse, or the civil exchange of…

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Voter Fraud or Voter Suppression? Using Political Science to Evaluate Competing Claims

by Michael A. Smith, Professor of Political Science, Emporia State University  This year’s contentious political climate has escalated a longstanding, partisan dispute over election laws and their…

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Celebrating 90 Years of University of Michigan Press

by Shaun Manning, Publications Sales and Exhibits Manager, University of Michigan Press. What is your company’s history? What sets your company apart? University of Michigan Press was founded in…

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Geographical Coverage in Political Science Research

by Matthew Charles Wilson, Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of South Carolina and Carl Henrik Knutsen, Professor of Political Science at the University of Oslo. Political…

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Exhibitor Spotlight: Springer Nature

by Lorraine Klimowich, Senior Editor for Political Science, Economics, and Public Administration, Springer Nature What is your company’s history? What sets your company apart? Springer was founded by…

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Is the Preference for Chaos a Rational Decision?

by Michael A. Smith, Professor of Political Science, Emporia State University  The study of “fake news” and other rumors spread via social media are gaining steam.  Recent work by political…

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Teaching Tactics: A Simple Hack for Maintaining Personal Connections to Students

By Matthew Charles Wilson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of South Carolina  This blog was originally published by the Incubator for Teaching Innovation at…

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Adjusting/Adapting Assignments for Flexibility and Engagement in Online Instruction

By Diane E. Schmidt, Ph.D., California State University, Chico, Political Science Online instruction, especially with students who are unfamiliar with online learning, requires balancing teaching…

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Measuring the Quality of Management of Federal Agencies

by James Thompson and Alejandra Medina, University of Illinois – Chicago In normal times, elected and appointed government officials pay relatively little attention to the question of how well…

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Do Millennials Exist? Generations, Social Science and the Trouble With De-Bunking

by Michael A. Smith, Professor of Political Science, Emporia State University  The host of TV’s “Adam Ruins Everything,” Adam Conover is easy to identify by his quirky hairsyle and clothes,…

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NHA’s New Toolkit: Documenting the Impact of Your Humanities Program

By Cecily Hill, NEH for All Director of Community Initiatives As of this writing, colleges and universities around the nation have closed their doors; most have shifted to online learning. In-person…

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Coping with COVID-19: A Graduate Student’s Reflections

By James Steur, a Ph.D. student in political science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign About one month ago, I wrote a blog post about strategies for networking at the 2020 MPSA…

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Understanding and Reducing Biases in Elite Beliefs About the Electorate 

by Miguel M. Pereira, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Political Science at Washington University in St. Louis. A central question in the process of representation is how elected officials…

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How the Pandemic Became Partisan: A Story of Parties, Science and Professionals

by Michael A. Smith, Professor of Political Science, Emporia State University  How did the Coronavirus pandemic become partisan? The partisan divide on responses to the pandemic is only the latest…

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To Networking & Beyond: Strategies for Successful Networking

By James Steur, a Ph.D. student in political science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign As MPSA 2020 fast approaches, my colleagues have talked to me about the part of conferences…

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Study the Humanities: Articulating Career Pathways

By Scott Muir, Study the Humanities Project Director, National Humanities Alliance Commentators have offered a variety of explanations for the widely observed decline in humanities majors and…

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Beyond the Hat: Will the Trump Coalition Hold in 2020?

by Michael A. Smith, Professor of Political Science, Emporia State University  Will President Trump’s Coalition hold in 2020? Hardly anyone seems to be asking this question, at least in public these…

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Can Gerrymandering be Measured? Here Come the Mathematicians

By Brian Hollenbeck and Michael Smith of Emporia State University Just weeks ago, the U.S. Supreme Court acted to sharply limit the role of the courts with regards to partisan gerrymandering. In…

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A Moment to Take Stock (and Keep Advocating)

By Beatrice Gurwitz, National Humanities Alliance Photo credit: Morrison Photography   For three years in a row, the Trump administration has called for the elimination of the National Endowment…

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Rethinking the Political Science Major – MPSA Roundtable (audio)

This roundtable Rethinking the Political Science Major (audio), chaired by John T. Ishiyama of  University of North Texas and featuring J. Cherie Strachan of Central Michigan University, Whitney…

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MPSA Member Profile: Ajenai Clemmons

Ajenai Clemmons is a Ph.D. Candidate in public policy with a concentration in political science at Duke University. Her academic research focuses on the most important factors that help and harm the…

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Show Me the Money: Securing Research Funding

By Charmaine N. Willis of University of Albany One of the most important parts of conducting any research project, regardless of its methodology, is securing research funding. The recent MPSA…

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Public Engagement: Simplify Without Being Simple

By James Steur at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign As a first-generation student, one of my primary goals as an academic is pursuing public scholarship. I want to write in a clear and…

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Keeping It Real: Political Science and Civic Engagement

By Michael Smith of Emporia State University Great #MPSA19 panel discussion regarding blogging, Twitter and podcasting w/@LaraMBrownPhD @NaymaQayum @JustinBullock14 @GreggRMurray and Michael Smith…

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Fieldwork: Ethical Considerations, Funding, and Data Collection Methods

By Charmaine N. Willis of University of Albany The recent MPSA conference offered many valuable roundtables related to professional development for a variety of populations including graduate…

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How to Thrive in Graduate School (Whatever That Means)

By Colleen Wood of Columbia University In addition to thematic panels, the 77th Annual MPSA Conference offered a wide range of roundtables on professional development including practical discussion…

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Biased Professors? Try Disclosure

By Michael A. Smith of Emporia University The allegation that professors are biased toward liberal, progressive, or even radical points of view has been part of American political discourse at least…

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Exploring Themes from “Advances in Physiology and Politics: Linking Physiology, Self-Reports, and Cognitive Responses” at #MPSA19

By James Steur of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign When I tell friends I’ve taken a class on the relationship between biology and politics, I generally get the same reaction: squinted…

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MPSA’s Standing ePanels: A Supportive Space for Feedback and Skill-Building

By Colleen Wood of Columbia University In the exhibition hall at MPSA, it is easy enough to get stuck in the book displays or free coffee stands. But for those who push past the publishing stands,…

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The Examination of the “Other:” An Insight Into The Asian Pacific Islander Experience in the Prison Industrial Complex

By Michelle M. Hicks, Willamette University   Who are the “others” inside the U.S. carceral system? According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the “other” is any race, which cannot be…

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Organization, Flexibility, and Thoughtfulness (#MPSA19 Prep)

By Danielle King of University of Missouri in St. Louis The responsibilities of a graduate student feel daunting under the most benign of circumstances. This semester, I have added in the extra…

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Two Paths to the Palmer House: Planning for the #MPSA19 Conference

By Colleen Wood of Columbia University Being a first-timer at MPSA is often synonymous with attending and presenting at any political science conference for the first time. For those graduate…

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Previewing the 77th Annual MPSA Conference Program: A Selection of Professional Development Panels for Graduate Students

By Charmaine N. Willis of University of Albany, SUNY As panelists frantically completing their papers and presentations are acutely aware, the 77th Annual MPSA Conference is fast approaching. In…

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First-Generation Findings: Eight Strategies for Success at Academic Conferences

By James Steur of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign  As a first-generation college student and son of two hairdressers, I’ve spent most of my life far removed from the world of…

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Work, Well-Being, and Social Connections: Advice from a Graduate Student on Finding the Correct Proportions

By Kevin DeLuca of Harvard University “If you love what you do, you’ll never work a day in your life.” - Some wise person For academics, I think the saying is backward: “If you, an academic, love…

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Democrats Want to Get Rid of the Electoral College. It is Not Going to Happen (and Maybe that’s Best).

By Michael A. Smith, Emporia State University With the 2020 campaign season having already begun (ugh), Democrats are revving up to do away with the Electoral College. For them, the case is a…

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The Art of Networking: How to Maximize Your Doctoral Experience

By Francesca Gottardi of the University of Cincinnati When thinking about a doctoral program, the first image that comes to mind is likely to be that of a geeky student sitting at a desk, buried in…

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Understand Department Culture, Perfect your Personal Statement, and Other Tips on Applying to Graduate School

MPSA Professional Development Roundtable Preview In advance of this year’s MPSA conference (April 4-7, 2019 in Chicago), we asked panelists from the upcoming “Tips on Applying to Graduate School” to…

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Juggling Academic Time and Technology: Advice from a Millennial

By Garrett Pierman of Florida International University The digital age is in full swing, especially in academia. In class, our students, if they are allowed, are browsing, tweeting, liking, and…

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MPSA’s Top 10 Blog Posts from 2018

As the calendar year begins to wind down, we take a look back at our most-read articles from 2018. We encourage you to take a quiet moment for another look as you may have missed an article or may…

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Call for #MPSA19 Conference Bloggers

Photo by Maarten van den Heuvel on Unsplash MPSA seeks bloggers to cover the most popular panels and events at the upcoming conference in Chicago.  Bloggers will be expected to research, craft and…

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The Big Lessons of Political Advertising in 2018

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. Screen shot of Beto O'Rourke’s Facebook ad, 2018. Facebook Erika Franklin Fowler,…

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MPSA Member Profile: Rebecca Dew

Dr. Rebecca Dew is an Independent Researcher based in Florida, where she can be reached at Academia.edu or her personal website, or followed on Twitter @beccadew. Additionally, Dew is a recent…

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The Only Thing We Have to Fear

By Michael A. Smith of Emporia State University Senator and Vice-President Hubert Humphrey‘s nickname was The Happy Warrior. He worked tirelessly on behalf of causes he championed, and usually…

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Magnify Your Voice: A Day Off for Democracy

By Betsy Sinclair of Washington University in St. Louis “Are you frustrated that you see a need in your community that isn’t met by government or industry? Do you believe that need could be remedied…

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MPSA Roundtable – Public Engagement: Mixing Academics and Practical Politics

In this public engagement roundtable from the 2018 MPSA conference, Michelle Kukoleca Hammes of Saint Cloud State University, Derrick Carter of Valparaiso University Law School, and Jared Wesley of…

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Generation Z voters could make waves in 2018 midterm elections

By Kei Kawashima-Ginsberg, Tufts University Unlike the much-studied millennials, we don’t know much about Generation Z, who now make up most of the 18- to 24-year-old voting bloc. These young people…

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MPSA Roundtable: The Path to Full

This MPSA roundtable session on “MPSA Roundtable: The Path to Full”, hosted by the Midwest Women’s Caucus and chaired by Tiffany Barnes of the University of Kentucky, features James Adams of…

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You can trust the polls in 2018, if you read them carefully

By Josh Pasek, University of Michigan and Michael Traugott, University of Michigan A Michigan township collects votes in 2016.Barbara Kalbfleisch/shutterstock On the morning of Nov. 8, 2016, many…

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Humanities for All: Political Science and International Relations

By Daniel Fisher, Project Director, National Humanities Alliance As campuses across the country fill with the renewed energy of the fall semester, it is a good time to pause to reflect on how we…

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Blue is Black and Red is White? Affective Polarization and the Racialized Schemas of U.S. Party Coalitions

By Nicholas A. Valentino and Kirill Zhirkov  [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XFMTdNxp57k] Affective polarization - the mutual partisan antipathy expressed by both Democrats and Republicans…

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Mentors play Critical Role in Quality of College Experience, New Poll Suggests

By Leo M. Lambert, Elon University; Jason Husser, Elon University, and Peter Felten, Elon University This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. In order to…

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Primary Elections: The Value of an Endorsement

By Chapman Rackaway of the University of West Georgia How involved should political party leaders get in primary elections? Should a President endorse a primary candidate, despite standards of…

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Blue Wave, Red Wave; What Wave? No Wave

By Chapman Rackaway of the University of West Georgia Political scientists and pundits alike face a contradictory challenge in the concept of the “wave” election. Journalists use the term commonly,…

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Contributing Political Science Knowledge to our Collective Conscious

Post by Royal G. Cravens, Bowling Green University This post originally appeared on the Wiki Education blog. Dr. Royal G. Cravens, III is a Lecturer in the Department of Political Science at Bowling…

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Spain’s majority-female cabinet embodies women’s global rise to power

By Susan Franceschet, University of Calgary and Karen Beckwith, Case Western Reserve University Gender-equal governments, which include the same number of men and women as ministry heads and in other…

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Save the Swamp

By Michael A. Smith of Emporia State University The Trump Administration’s recent reversal on immigration policy regarding children has gotten me to thinking. What exactly does it mean to “drain the…

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Ethnic Networks

The following is part of a series of posts written by MPSA award recipients highlighting outstanding research presented at previous MPSA annual conferences and in the American Journal of Political…

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How Governments Influence Competition between Militant Groups

By Justin Conrad and William Spaniel When Algeria descended into violence in the 1990s, two militant groups – the Islamic Salvation Army (AIS) and the Armed Islamic Group (GIA) – competed for…

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All Male Panels Erode Citizens’ Perceptions of Democratic Legitimacy

By Amanda Clayton, Diana Z. O'Brien, and Jennifer M. Piscopo All-male panels increasingly face public pushback. Though once ubiquitous, male-only groups are encountering greater scrutiny at…

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The Deliberative Sublime: Edmund Burke on Disruptive Speech and Imaginative Judgment

Edmund Burke Engraving By Rob Goodman of McGill University Could it be true that judicious political conduct requires injudicious political language? Is there a case to be made for the value, amidst…

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Back End Skills

By Chad Raymond of Salve Regina University and Active Learning in Political Science Most ALPS posts deal with the front end of teaching — the stuff that eventually turns into the student experience.…

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Voting Can Be Hard, Information Helps

By Melody Crowder-Meyer, Shana Kushner Gadarian, and Jessica Trounstine When Los Angeles County voters entered their polling booths in November 2016, they were faced with a multitude of decisions.…

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What 18,000 Declassified Documents (and a Computer) Reveal About the Credibility of Signals During Crises

By Eric Min of Stanford University Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev, left, and U.S. President John F. Kennedy sit in the residence of the U.S. ambassador in Vienna, Austria, at the start of their…

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Foster Care Privatization: How an Increasingly Popular Public Policy Leads to Increased Levels of Abuse and Neglect

Foster care in the United States is dramatically influenced by federal and state legislation. Since the late 1990s policies establishing privatized foster care have become increasingly popular…

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In Retrospect: Tips for First-Time MPSA Attendees and Presenters

By Charmaine N. Willis of University at Albany, SUNY As I reflect on my first MPSA conference there are few things that I would have done differently, both prior to and during the conference. I…

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Diffusion by Any Means Necessary

By Harold “Harry” Young of Austin Peay State University Members of the "GRAD SCHOOL: What to Expect at a Job Interview at a Teaching School" roundtable at the 2018 MPSA conference in Chicago. They…

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Reflections on the #MPSA18 Mentoring Reception

On the second day of the 76th Annual Conference, MPSA held a mentoring reception for which graduate students, PhD recipients in non-academic positions, junior, mid-career, and contingent faculty…

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More Bridging, Less Bonding: New Views of Social Capital

(or, Why I am Going to Watch Roseanne) by Michael A. Smith of Emporia State University Social capital has been a popular concept in political science, at least since the publication of Almond and…

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Finger on the Pulse: Alive and Kicking at MPSA 2018

By Harold "Harry" Young of Austin Peay State University At this year’s MPSA conference, I was on a mission to uncover what participants were so serious about as they hovered over laptops and chatted…

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Politics and Ontology in Thucydides’ story of Alcmaeon

By Borden Flanagan of American University The story of Alcmaeon, in an emphatically unnecessary digression, frames Periclean imperialism in terms of the cosmological themes of motion and rest,…

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The Public Expert: How Academics Can Break the Ivory Tower Stereotype #MPSA18

By Alex Ellison In the professional development track at the Midwest Political Science Association Conference in Chicago, IL, there were a couple of sessions on using social media in academia and…

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The New Political Scientists—We’re Live, We’re Nationwide, and We’re Online

By Michael A. Smith, Professor of Political Science at Emporia State University On the first day of the Midwest Political Science Conference (#MPSA18 on Twitter), I spotted both a roundtable and a…

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Do Academics Stink at Work/Life Balance?

And is this scaring away students? By Alex Ellison At the 2018 Midwest Political Science Association Conference in Chicago, IL, I attended the session, Trying to Balance Work and Life with Joel…

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Why the 2020 census shouldn’t ask about your citizenship status

A naturalization ceremony, in December 2015. AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File Jennifer Van Hook, Pennsylvania State University “Is this person a citizen of the United States?” On March 26, the U.S. Commerce…

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The 2018 MPSA Conference Is Here: What Have You Done for Me Lately?

By Harold Young of Austin Peay State University “Expectations should not always be taken as reality; because you never know when you will be disappointed.”  ― Samuel P. Huntington I must admit I am…

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Politics in the Trump Era – A Curated Guide to MPSA 2018

by Chana M. Solomon-Schwartz  In less than a month, scholars from more than 50 countries will congregate at the 2018 MPSA conference to present research, connect with one another, and eat deep-dish…

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Why Would A Mom and A Business Owner Get An MPA?

And what does she do with it? By Alex Ellison Photo by Dakota Corbin on Unsplash I was accepted to the University of Chicago to their MA Program in Social Sciences. I visited, sent in my deposit and…

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Chicago Tips and Recommendations from a Graduate Student

By Charmaine N. Willis This year marks my first year attending MPSA. I look forward to being able to share my research, to receive feedback, and to network with other scholars at one of the biggest…

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How Predictable is Your Work?

The truth about job security in the future By Alex Ellison   If you spend a lot of time doing predictable, physical work tasks in the accommodation and food services sector, you might want…

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Members of Congress respond to more than money – sometimes

By Jan Leighley, American University and Jennifer Oser, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Does citizen activism really affect the actions of elected officials? Despite the ubiquitous role of money…

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When the elite abandon democracy – A Warning from Belize?

By Harold Young of Austin Peay State University “An individual has not started living until he can rise above the narrow confines of his individualistic concerns to the broader concerns of all…

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Recap of #MPSAchat with COSSA’s Julia Milton

This month’s MPSA Twitter Chat featured a conversation with the Consortium of Social Science Association (COSSA)'s Assistant Director for Public Affairs/Government Relations Associate Julia Milton…

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New ways scientists can help put science back into popular culture

Science is one thread of culture – and entertainment, including graphic books, can reflect that. 'The Dialogues,' by Clifford V. Johnson (MIT Press 2017), CC BY-ND Clifford Johnson, University of…

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Faculty Advantage: Using Wikipedia to Teach Controversial Topics

By Mark K. Cassell of Kent State University  It’s a problem nearly everyone who teaches political science confronts at one time or another: how to effectively teach a controversial topic. Topics like…

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MPSA in 2017 – Accomplishments Worth Celebrating (video)

  This year was confusing at times and exhausting at others, but it also had its high points. As we say goodbye to 2017, we welcome you to join us for the MPSA highlight reel. Our thanks to everyone…

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MPSA’s Top 10 Blog Posts from 2017

There is no doubt that 2017 was a memorable year in political science.  As the year comes to a close, it’s time to take a look back at our the most-read blog posts from the past twelve months. #10…

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The Top 5 MPSA Roundtable Audio Recordings (podcasts) from 2017

Each year at its annual conference, MPSA records dozens of professional development panels focusing on topics most relevant to researchers and to those who teach. Audio from the roundtable…

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Recap of Tuesday’s #PSBeWell End-of-Semester/Holiday Edition

This month’s MPSA Twitter Chat featured a conversation about creating a less stressful end-of-semester experience for those on both sides of the syllabus, ways to balance work and personal time…

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Call for #MPSA18 Conference Bloggers

MPSA seeks bloggers (and vloggers) to cover the most popular panels and events at the upcoming conference in Chicago. Just as the MPSA conference concentrates on the best thinking in the discipline,…

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More Guns, Less Replication: The Case for Robust Research Findings

The meaning of the word “replication” hardly seems like the sort of thing that would land a person in court. Yet, it did. In Lott v. Levitt (2009), the U.S. District Court of Northern Illinois ruled…

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#MPSAchat with AJPS Editor William G. Jacoby (10/24)

On Tuesday, October 24 (2pm Eastern), please join us for a Twitter chat with American Journal of Political Science editor William G. Jacoby. We’ll chat with Jacoby on trends he has identified during…

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MPSA Roundtable on Public Engagement: Communicating and Promoting Your Research

This MPSA roundtable session on “Public Engagement: Communicating and Promoting Your Research”, organized by Kathleeen Searles of Louisiana State University and Women Also Know Stuff and chaired by…

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#MPSAchat – Teaching Political Science in a Politicized Environment

On Tuesday, September 26 at 2:00 PM (Eastern), please join us for a Twitter chat on Teaching Political Science in a Politicized Environment. This month’s chat topic has been inspired by “Frequently…

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MPSA Roundtable on Congressional Leadership through the Eyes of Randy Strahan and Barbara Sinclair

Sean M. Theriault of the University of Texas at Austin, chairs this MPSA roundtable session on “Congressional Leadership through the Eyes of Randy Strahan and Barbara Sinclair” with Gregory Koger,…

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Intrastate Conflicts: Refocus on the Intractable

By Harold A. Young The burden and devastation of intrastate conflicts are disproportionally borne by people of color in the developing world. While many people of color in the United States may view…

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MPSA Roundtable on Applying to Grad School

Mackenzie H. Eason of the University of California – Los Angeles chairs this MPSA roundtable session on “Applying to Graduate School” with Coty J. Martin, West Virginia University, Joan…

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If you’re going to San Francisco…

... Visit us at APSA Booth #904! Look for MPSA in booth #904 in the APSA expo hall where we'll be busy answering questions about the MPSA conference, the new Twitter chat series, and your MPSA…

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Recap of MPSA Chat (Work-Life Balance #PSBeWell)

Many thanks to our co-hosts for the discussion:  Todd Curry, Assistant Professor of Political Science at The University of Texas at El Paso, Jacqueline Sievert, Research Fellow with YWCA Niagara, and…

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An Invitation to Participate: MPSA’s Inaugural Twitter Chat #PSBeWell

A healthy work-life balance is important regardless of where you are in your academic career. Every PhD has the first-hand experience with Grad School struggles. Every tenured professor can remember…

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Politics and Sunburn: Snapshot of the U.S. from Belize

By Harold Young, Ph.D. The sun blazed, cooled only by sporadic showers, during my recent visit to the Central American and Caribbean nation of Belize where I spent my formative years. The size of…

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MPSA Career Roundtable on What to Do/Not Do at a Job Talk (audio)

Listen in as Elizabeth A. Bennion of Indiana University-South Bend chairs the MPSA Career Roundtable on “What to Do and What Not to Do at a Job Talk” with Mary Hallock Morris of University of…

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(The Lack of) Diversity in Trump’s America

By Adaobi Duru, University of Louisiana at Monroe The lack of diversity in Trump's cabinet appointment is significant and might be a reflection of the President's position on issues regarding racial…

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Q&A with Emily Farris re: The TCU Justice Journey

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=slfLGQewr6A?rel=0&controls=0] MPSA member Emily Farris is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Texas Christian University (TCU) in Fort Worth,…

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Next Steps in the Fight to #SavetheNEH

Two days before President Trump’s inauguration, we awoke to reports that the transition team was contemplating a proposal to eliminate funding for the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and…

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Ruling by Distraction

To rule by distraction is a time-tested tool of autocratic and authoritarian regimes. It is a go-to move for non-democratic regimes when faced with a challenge, domestic or international. As the…

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This Is the Best Time Ever to Study Political Science

This post originally appeared on Tom Pepinsky’s blog and is reposted here with permission.  Here are ten questions that might be interesting to Americans these days. Is the Trump administration’s…

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Alone and Working: Making the Transition to ABD

The change from being a PhD Student to a PhD Candidate is a big one. The moment we cross that threshold of becoming ABD, we fall in to a kind of purgatory where we are no longer students and not yet…

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I’m Not a Disgrace, I’m Just Wrong

Shortly after the 2016 U.S. presidential election, I gave a talk to a local senior citizens group. The talk was largely informational, flavored by my analysis of what had happened. After the speech,…

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Race and “Ism”: Incoming Fire from All Directions

Since it is impossible to discuss the issue of racism from the beginning, I will just start where I find myself. As an Assistant professor, it is probably safe for me to say that the…

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Help Preserve Federal Funding for the Humanities

NHA Annual meeting and Advocacy Day (Photo: Kwana Strong Photography) With a new President and Congress taking office this month, it is time to redouble our advocacy efforts on behalf of the National…

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Polling for the 2016 Presidential Election: What Went Wrong?

As I write, Donald Trump is less than two weeks from being inaugurated as President of the United States. For political scientists, our “what the…?” moment involves the failure of most…

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MPSA Blog: Top 10 Posts from 2016

Regardless of your research interests, your academic (or Alt-Ac) role, or your aspirations for the new year, there is something on this list of MPSA’s most popular blog posts from 2016 that is sure…

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On the Eve of the 2017 Conference Season

As the Fall semester comes to a close, most academics in our field are readying for the upcoming hectic conference schedule starting with SPSA in New Orleans in January, ISA (February) in Baltimore,…

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Policy Implementation, Representation, and Democratic Governance

At last year’s MPSA conference, Pamela McCann of USC Sol Price School of Public Policy was kind enough to ask me to participate in a roundtable discussion with other prominent scholars. The focus of…

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Election 2016 Lesson for the Media: New Journalistic Norms Needed to Cover Elections

The 2016 U.S. presidential election will stand out in the nation’s collective memory as a highly unusual event for many reasons. It featured two unique candidates, an election campaign that…

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Recommended Reading: Themes from Election 2016

In the week since the election of Donald Trump, many citizens and political scientists are trying to understand both the underlying causes of the win while thinking about the implications for the…

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MPSA Member Interview: Emily Kalah Gade

Emily Kalah Gade is a PhD Candidate at the University of Washington at Seattle and has recently been awarded a Moore/Sloan Data Science and Washington Research Foundation Innovation in Data Science…

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Political Science: The Cure for Election Anxiety

Reporters are discovering a new phenomenon this year: election anxiety.  This year’s contests, particularly the one for President, have Americans worried and minds racing. The cure is right here:…

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One PhD Candidate’s Roadmap for Successful Co-Authorship

All of us at one point or another have either considered or have been involved in a co-authored project. With the way academia is evolving, co-authorship is not only encouraged but it is fast…

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7 Keys to a Successful MPSA Proposal Submission

Editor's Note: Since this blog post has been published, MPSA's proposal deadline for papers, complete panels, and roundtables has been EXTENDED to Tuesday, October 18, 2016. Knowing that political…

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3 Questions for MPSA Member Emil Ordukhanyan

Emil Ordukhanyan is Senior Lecturer at UNESCO Chair on Human Rights, Democracy and European Studies at Yerevan Brusov State University of Languages and Social Sciences-Armenia. Ordukhanyan is also…

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(Un)Natural Disasters: Distributive Politics in Northeast Brazil

The following is part of a series of posts written by 2016 MPSA award recipients highlighting outstanding research presented at previous MPSA annual conferences. Photos from Cooperman’s fieldwork in…

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MPSA Member Profile: Eric Raile

Eric Raile is Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and serves as the Director of the Human Ecology Learning & Problem Solving (HELPS) Lab at Montana State University,…

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Bias and Women’s Under-Representation in Politics

Even if Hillary Clinton shatters the “highest” glass ceiling this November, for many years to come women are likely to remain under-represented in elected offices in the United States and throughout…

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The Roundup: Political Science on Wikipedia

This article by Eryk Salvaggio originally appeared at the Wiki Education Foundation blog and is shared here with permission. The Wikipedia Year of Science has had a significant impact on Wikipedia’s…

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Making Sure the Light at the end of the Tunnel is not a Train: Securing a Faculty Position

After more than six years as a graduate student, and having survived the rigors of academic life including assignment deadlines, student teaching, qualifying exams, proposal defense and drafting my…

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[Im]Polite Conversation: Understanding the Mechanisms for Disengagement from Contentious Political Interactions

This post is one of a series of by MPSA members about their Federally-funded research.  Here, Jaime Settle and Taylor Carlson summarize their NSF-funded research "Understanding the Mechanisms for…

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Beyond Diversity: The Salience of Ethnicity and Kenya’s Constituency Development Fund

Following is from a series of blog posts by MPSA members about their research that has received funding by either the National Science Foundation (NSF) or the National Endowment for the Humanities…

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Bernie Goldwater: What Sanders Supporters Can Learn from Young Americans for Freedom

Supporters were crestfallen, but their resolve was firm. Their candidate had refused to buckle to the pressure from party elite—the usual pressure from political managers, to move to the political…

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How Do Experiences with Government Programs Shape Political and Civic Engagement? Looking Beyond the American Case

A key insight of policy feedback theories is that government offices are sites of adult political learning. As Joe Soss explains:  “…public bureaucracies provide relatively immediate experiences with…

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Mass Administrative Reorganization, Media Attention, and the Paradox of Information

The following is part of a series of posts written by 2016 MPSA award recipients highlighting outstanding research presented at previous MPSA annual conferences. Our article – Mass Administrative…

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A Portrait of Politics: The Cultural Marketing of the Chicago Neighborhood of Pilsen

The following is part of a series of posts written by 2016 MPSA award recipients highlighting outstanding research presented at previous MPSA annual conferences. Urban space is temporal, contextual…

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Studying the Immediate Impact of Racially Traumatic Stressful Events

Following is one in a series of blog posts by MPSA members about their research that has received funding by either the National Science Foundation (NSF) or the National Endowment for the Humanities…

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Social Media: Great Campaign Tool, but Bad News for Democracy

By now, we have all read about and analyzed Donald Trump’s (in)famous Cinco de Mayo tweet, which featured a picture of him grinning broadly while eating a taco bowl, with the following tweet: “Happy…

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The Company You Keep: How Voters Infer Party Positions on European Integration from Governing Coalition Arrangements

The following is the first in a series of posts written by 2016 MPSA award recipients highlighting outstanding research presented at previous MPSA annual conferences. Democratic accountability…

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Trendspotting Through the Gradventurist’s Lens

Now that it has been two weeks since MPSA 2016 ended, there are a few trends I observed during the conference that I feel need revisiting especially from a graduate student perspective. The…

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The American Impasse Between Environmentalists and Industry

In a recent book by Joel S. Whitworth, “Quantified: Redefining Conservation for the Next Economy” (Whitworth 2015), the author issues a bold challenge claiming that our 45-year old approaches to…

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If Political Science Ruled the World (and We Were on Our Best Behavior)

Once, as a graduate student at the University of Missouri, I wisecracked, "the entire world should be turned over to political scientists for experimental purposes." I was joking and everyone knew…

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A Grad Life Recap of the 2016 MPSA Conference

As the MPSA 2016 conference wraps up, I wanted to share a few thoughts as a first time attendee. This has been a phenomenal experience for me and my colleagues (most of whom are also first time…

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Political Science: The Final Frontier

Can science fiction teach us about political institutions? A group of political scientists says yes. James Endersby of the University of Missouri-Columbia is spearheading a project with several of…

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Your To Do List: One Week until MPSA 2016

We are one week away from the MPSA 2016 conference and a lot of us are still scrambling to get everything in order. Those of us making it to the MPSA for the very first time are especially equal…

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Sir Edmund and Hillary: A Surprisingly Likely Pair

Mainstream political scientists often struggle with the subfield called political theory. Otherwise known as normative theory or political philosophy, theory is the study of history, philosophy, and…

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Tough Enough? National Security Issues Could Affect the 2016 U.S. Presidential Race

NEW YORK CITY - MARCH 2, 2016: Hillary Rodham Clinton affirmed her status as front-runner for the Democratic presidential nominations with a speech at Jacob Javits Center. Following the November 2015…

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Studying for Comps? Here are Three Approaches to Try Based on Learning Style

An example of the author’s mind mapping technique (click to expand). There comes a time in every PhD student’s career where they have to sit through the dreaded qualifying exams (or “comps” as they…

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Will the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election Be a Realigning Election?

In his classic book Dynamics of the Party System, James L. Sundquist developed a theory of how party alignments change around new issues. As a winner-take-all system, (also called “first past the…

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Incorporating Family in Your MPSA Conference Experience

So having done it recently myself, I understand how challenging it can be to have family join you during a conference. Out of necessity, I recently had my two little ones (both under the age of five)…

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Three Methods to Ready Your Research for Public Absorption

Recently one of the biggest discussions within the field of political science has been on how to use our research for policy making purposes. The debate has focused on finding the best possible…

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Q&A with the Founder of Women Also Know Stuff

Samara Klar is an Assistant Professor at the School of Government and Public Policy at the University of Arizona and is the founder of Women Also Know Stuff. A database of female experts in politics,…

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Primaries and Caucuses 2016: Experiencing the Energy and Demystifying the Math

INDIANOLA, IA - FEBRUARY 1, 2016: Indianola mayor Kelly Shaw (second from right) and Smith's Emporia State University students at the Iowa caucus. (Photo courtesy: Michael A. Smith) The 2016…

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Gender and Emotions on the Campaign Trail

WASHINGTON - JANUARY 13, 2009: U.S. Secretary of State Nominee and incumbent U.S. Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-NY) testifies during her confirmation hearing before the Senate Foreign Relations…

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Presenting At Conferences – A Grad Student’s Guide

Presenting at a conference is a daunting task for any academic. Be it a big name academic who has spent a career presenting at conferences around the world or a graduate student who is just starting…

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On the Hill: Linda Trautman’s Experience at COSSA’s Advocacy Day

Linda Trautman, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Ohio University Lancaster who specializes in American Government and Politics with a focus on legislative politics, mass…

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#MPSA16– Is Political Science Still Relevant?

It is only 35 minutes from the Palmer House to 4100 S. Pulaski Road. Downtown Chicago’s ornate Palmer House hotel will host the 74th annual Midwest Political Science Association (MPSA) conference, as…

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Interested in Blogging for MPSA?

MPSA seeks to feature blog posts that focuses on research relevant to current topics in the media, teaching trends and professional development. The blog will be a place for MPSA to highlight the…

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When Grievances Do Not Mean Violence

By Bethany Lacina The vast majority of political violence is within rather than between states. How do national politics—that is, the central government's attempts to stay in office—make civil…

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Social Esteem and Participation in Contentious Politics

By Gwyneth McClendon Why do individuals participate in non-voting forms of collective political action? The last few years have been rife with examples of rallies, protests and demonstrations: from…

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Dollars on the Sidewalk: Should U.S. Presidential Candidates Advertise in Uncontested States?

Carly Urban, Montana State University Sarah Niebler, Dickinson College Why do individuals contribute to political campaigns? There are many reasons people may give—ranging from the warm glow they…

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AJPS Author Jakana Thomas on The Monkey Cage

Jakana Thomas, an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at Michigan State University, posted an article on The Monkey Cage, titled "Actually, sometimes terrorism does work." Read…

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